HYPERtheticals: 50 Questions for Insane Conversations Chuck Klosterman | PDF

Chuck Klosterman

This is the best board/card game on the planet, hands-down.

These are tough hypothetical questions, and as the author puts it, the point really isn't the answer, but the thought process. Seeing how someone thinks about this is really what the game is about, not their one-word answer.

And in the interest of the thought process, I'm going to answer my favorite, not because the question is my favorite, but because I'm the ONLY person I've polled who answered the question the way I did:

You have won a prize. The prize has two options, and you can choose either (but not both). The first option is a year in Europe with a monthly stipend of $2,000. The second option is ten minutes on the moon. Which option do you select?

Please consider the question and come up with your own reasoning. I'll wait.

...

If you're like most people I've asked, you said Europe. If you're unlike most people I've asked (and unlike me) you said "The Moon."

First, let me dismantle the most common arguments I hear in favor of Europe when this question is asked.

1. A year is a lot longer than 10 minutes
This is true. It's mathematical fact. However, it doesn't seem, to me, that the truth of the difference between a year and ten minutes really speaks to the quality of those experiences. Also, you'd presumably have to reassemble your life after being away for a year. 10 minutes is a mildly long amount of time to be in the bathroom.

2. There's nothing on the moon to see/do
I couldn't disagree with that more, but at the very least, you could see the entire planet Earth. Also, being on the Moon is definitely something that happens to you more than somewhere you go to do stuff. You are there as opposed to seeing what else is there. It's a very different human experience, perhaps only having modern equivalents in Antarctica or at something like the Grand Canyon if you're the sentimental type. Plus, there are bags of shit left by the Apollo 11 astronauts. Nothing to see? That stuff, as Indiana Jones would put it, belongs in a museum.

3. A year off would be so nice and relaxing
I'm not much of a relaxer. That's not my thing, really. Sitting around doing very little just isn't that interesting to me. Now anxiety, THAT'S my thing. I know myself well enough to know that I wouldn't really relax, ever. I would be like a kid during summer vacation, counting down the remaining days until I was swept back into a normal, hellish life that I hate. And I would also be constantly fretting about the way to squeeze as much as possible out of this trip. I'm confident that I can fully enjoy 10 minutes on the Moon to its full potential without checking my space watch even once. In Europe, I'd be constantly oscillating between trying to relax and feeling like I was squandering the time.

4. People have been to the Moon before.
If people being there or not before was a primary argument, then Europe would lose that argument, hands-down. Also, lots of people have summited Everest. That doesn't seem to stop lots of other people from doing it.

Here are my reasons for answering that I would hit The Moon

1. At the end of 10 minutes, I would know whether the moon was life-altering.
Internally, I'm different. Externally, I'm the same. I could start and finish this trip during a coffee break at work. It would take me less time to visit the moon than it would to rewatch the episode of The Simpsons where Homer becomes an astronaut. While it's impossible to say whether the moon might be more life-altering than a year of Europe, ten minutes on the moon would make it very easy to know whether the moon is a life-changing experience or not. I would have spent a very small amount of time there. I wouldn't have aged much (and in fact would have aged slower than I would have had I spent that 10 minutes on Earth, I believe). Whereas the European experience would be mixed. Was I changed because I've aged? Because I didn't work for an entire year? Because of the individuals I met or because of the larger cultural experiences? It's a bad experiment in personal change as it would seem almost impossible not to change over the course of a year where my life was that different. It's the classic problem when someone goes backpacking in Europe. Did the trip change them, or do those folks simply have a more easily contained context in which they could make their personal changes, changes most of us go through at around the same age people would tend to backpack in Europe?

2. I could go to Europe
A $2,000/month stipend is a little less than $25,000. In theory, if I really made it my life's ambition, I'm confident that I could save that money and make the trip. I paid off a $20,000 student loan in less than ten years, so it would stand to reason that I could save $25K over that same period and make the trip. It's never occurred to me to do this, which says to me that it's not a big personal goal. I have zero confidence in my ability to save the amount of money it might take to visit the Moon, if that were even an available option, which it currently is not. Ultimately, the Moon is a closed door regardless of my physical ability, age, and savings potential. Europe is wide open. Selecting the Moon does allow for the potential for both.

3. The physical, lasting sensation of low gravity is not something I would ever experience otherwise. Mary Roach talked about this in her book, Packing For Mars, that zero gravity makes you realize how heavy your organs are, and even the way your hair pulls down from your head. It's not until you experience the change that you realize the physical sensation of gravity. It's such a fundamental change in something very visceral and difficult to explain that I think it would offer the more interesting physical experience.

4. Parties and meetings are so much easier after that.
It doesn't matter if you're at a bar, a party, wherever, being on the Moon trumps everything. I'll be 100% honest with you, I'd rather spend 10 minutes talking to someone who has been on the Moon than I would any former President. No matter where you are, no matter what the situation, you have the best story. Unless that dude with the two penises who did the Reddit AMA is around. In that case I'd be willing to concede a tie.

51

I still feel these chuck klosterman things and remember these moments even now, even three years after i retired. The tornado chuck klosterman continued northeastward, destroying a cinder block garage and damaging a mobile home along 6th street, just southeast of bridgeport. At a dinner one person will usually pay for all the diners on the basis that it hypertheticals: 50 questions for insane conversations is that person's turn rather than try to divide equally or apportion accurately. The following table privileges chuck klosterman authorize operations on a table. hypertheticals: 50 questions for insane conversations q: what is ap's style on the military's don't ask, don't tell policy? District praga in warsaw after hypertheticals: 50 questions for insane conversations german bombardment in september. hypertheticals: 50 questions for insane conversations recommended, if you like to have a quality stay in ljubljana! Professor paul kengor calls in to discuss documents that hypertheticals: 50 questions for insane conversations prove this And the news has led the club to begin planning for what would be their first hypertheticals: 50 questions for insane conversations game of the season. Listed beneath are the most up-to-date sites that hypertheticals: 50 questions for insane conversations we choose …. chuck klosterman would you watch an experimental film in theatres without reading its review? The two-tone chuck klosterman coding format uses a total of tones ranging from 67 to.

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these are tough hypothetical questions, and as the author puts it, the point really isn't the answer, but the thought process. seeing how someone thinks about this is really what the game is about, not their one-word answer.

and in the interest of the thought process, i'm going to answer my favorite, not because the question is my favorite, but because i'm the only person i've polled who answered the question the way i did:

you have won a prize. the prize has two options, and you can choose either (but not both). the first option is a year in europe with a monthly stipend of $2,000. the second option is ten minutes on the moon. which option do you select?

please consider the question and come up with your own reasoning. i'll wait.

...

if you're like most people i've asked, you said europe. if you're unlike most people i've asked (and unlike me) you said "the moon."

first, let me dismantle the most common arguments i hear in favor of europe when this question is asked.

1. a year is a lot longer than 10 minutes
this is true. it's mathematical fact. however, it doesn't seem, to me, that the truth of the difference between a year and ten minutes really speaks to the quality of those experiences. also, you'd presumably have to reassemble your life after being away for a year. 10 minutes is a mildly long amount of time to be in the bathroom.

2. there's nothing on the moon to see/do
i couldn't disagree with that more, but at the very least, you could see the entire planet earth. also, being on the moon is definitely something that happens to you more than somewhere you go to do stuff. you are there as opposed to seeing what else is there. it's a very different human experience, perhaps only having modern equivalents in antarctica or at something like the grand canyon if you're the sentimental type. plus, there are bags of shit left by the apollo 11 astronauts. nothing to see? that stuff, as indiana jones would put it, belongs in a museum.

3. a year off would be so nice and relaxing
i'm not much of a relaxer. that's not my thing, really. sitting around doing very little just isn't that interesting to me. now anxiety, that's my thing. i know myself well enough to know that i wouldn't really relax, ever. i would be like a kid during summer vacation, counting down the remaining days until i was swept back into a normal, hellish life that i hate. and i would also be constantly fretting about the way to squeeze as much as possible out of this trip. i'm confident that i can fully enjoy 10 minutes on the moon to its full potential without checking my space watch even once. in europe, i'd be constantly oscillating between trying to relax and feeling like i was squandering the time.

4. people have been to the moon before.
if people being there or not before was a primary argument, then europe would lose that argument, hands-down. also, lots of people have summited everest. that doesn't seem to stop lots of other people from doing it.

here are my reasons for answering that i would hit the moon

1. at the end of 10 minutes, i would know whether the moon was life-altering.
internally, i'm different. externally, i'm the same. i could start and finish this trip during a coffee break at work. it would take me less time to visit the moon than it would to rewatch the episode of the simpsons where homer becomes an astronaut. while it's impossible to say whether the moon might be more life-altering than a year of europe, ten minutes on the moon would make it very easy to know whether the moon is a life-changing experience or not. i would have spent a very small amount of time there. i wouldn't have aged much (and in fact would have aged slower than i would have had i spent that 10 minutes on earth, i believe). whereas the european experience would be mixed. was i changed because i've aged? because i didn't work for an entire year? because of the individuals i met or because of the larger cultural experiences? it's a bad experiment in personal change as it would seem almost impossible not to change over the course of a year where my life was that different. it's the classic problem when someone goes backpacking in europe. did the trip change them, or do those folks simply have a more easily contained context in which they could make their personal changes, changes most of us go through at around the same age people would tend to backpack in europe?

2. i could go to europe
a $2,000/month stipend is a little less than $25,000. in theory, if i really made it my life's ambition, i'm confident that i could save that money and make the trip. i paid off a $20,000 student loan in less than ten years, so it would stand to reason that i could save $25k over that same period and make the trip. it's never occurred to me to do this, which says to me that it's not a big personal goal. i have zero confidence in my ability to save the amount of money it might take to visit the moon, if that were even an available option, which it currently is not. ultimately, the moon is a closed door regardless of my physical ability, age, and savings potential. europe is wide open. selecting the moon does allow for the potential for both.

3. the physical, lasting sensation of low gravity is not something i would ever experience otherwise. mary roach talked about this in her book, packing for mars, that zero gravity makes you realize how heavy your organs are, and even the way your hair pulls down from your head. it's not until you experience the change that you realize the physical sensation of gravity. it's such a fundamental change in something very visceral and difficult to explain that i think it would offer the more interesting physical experience.

4. parties and meetings are so much easier after that.
it doesn't matter if you're at a bar, a party, wherever, being on the moon trumps everything. i'll be 100% honest with you, i'd rather spend 10 minutes talking to someone who has been on the moon than i would any former president. no matter where you are, no matter what the situation, you have the best story. unless that dude with the two penises who did the reddit ama is around. in that case i'd be willing to concede a tie. cand cu m'andstirea secul pentru via din cofesti care pogoane au fost puse de pdrintele varlaam" opundndu-se cererii lor: statornicirile pravilei testamentul si marturiile duhovnicului lui varlaam, pdrintele dosotheiu ot sta mo- nastir nemetcomu, ed. Not the 51 best solution but that was the contractors fix. 51 the language of mudra is based on 24 mudras enumerated in the natyashastra and 28 in the abhinaya darpana. You've probably already guessed that wyib is just the opposite of wyif: bring your yarn to the back of the work before you 51 take the next step in the pattern. Pros: construction is solid both ear cups are soft and they dampen outside sound well no usb for power the microphone that everyone is complaining about is great, no static or 51 weird problems with speaking. Settings for personal, short-circuit and overload protection 51 are automatically adjusted according to these calculations. All chapter activities and functions are halted until this is the best board/card game on the planet, hands-down.

these are tough hypothetical questions, and as the author puts it, the point really isn't the answer, but the thought process. seeing how someone thinks about this is really what the game is about, not their one-word answer.

and in the interest of the thought process, i'm going to answer my favorite, not because the question is my favorite, but because i'm the only person i've polled who answered the question the way i did:

you have won a prize. the prize has two options, and you can choose either (but not both). the first option is a year in europe with a monthly stipend of $2,000. the second option is ten minutes on the moon. which option do you select?

please consider the question and come up with your own reasoning. i'll wait.

...

if you're like most people i've asked, you said europe. if you're unlike most people i've asked (and unlike me) you said "the moon."

first, let me dismantle the most common arguments i hear in favor of europe when this question is asked.

1. a year is a lot longer than 10 minutes
this is true. it's mathematical fact. however, it doesn't seem, to me, that the truth of the difference between a year and ten minutes really speaks to the quality of those experiences. also, you'd presumably have to reassemble your life after being away for a year. 10 minutes is a mildly long amount of time to be in the bathroom.

2. there's nothing on the moon to see/do
i couldn't disagree with that more, but at the very least, you could see the entire planet earth. also, being on the moon is definitely something that happens to you more than somewhere you go to do stuff. you are there as opposed to seeing what else is there. it's a very different human experience, perhaps only having modern equivalents in antarctica or at something like the grand canyon if you're the sentimental type. plus, there are bags of shit left by the apollo 11 astronauts. nothing to see? that stuff, as indiana jones would put it, belongs in a museum.

3. a year off would be so nice and relaxing
i'm not much of a relaxer. that's not my thing, really. sitting around doing very little just isn't that interesting to me. now anxiety, that's my thing. i know myself well enough to know that i wouldn't really relax, ever. i would be like a kid during summer vacation, counting down the remaining days until i was swept back into a normal, hellish life that i hate. and i would also be constantly fretting about the way to squeeze as much as possible out of this trip. i'm confident that i can fully enjoy 10 minutes on the moon to its full potential without checking my space watch even once. in europe, i'd be constantly oscillating between trying to relax and feeling like i was squandering the time.

4. people have been to the moon before.
if people being there or not before was a primary argument, then europe would lose that argument, hands-down. also, lots of people have summited everest. that doesn't seem to stop lots of other people from doing it.

here are my reasons for answering that i would hit the moon

1. at the end of 10 minutes, i would know whether the moon was life-altering.
internally, i'm different. externally, i'm the same. i could start and finish this trip during a coffee break at work. it would take me less time to visit the moon than it would to rewatch the episode of the simpsons where homer becomes an astronaut. while it's impossible to say whether the moon might be more life-altering than a year of europe, ten minutes on the moon would make it very easy to know whether the moon is a life-changing experience or not. i would have spent a very small amount of time there. i wouldn't have aged much (and in fact would have aged slower than i would have had i spent that 10 minutes on earth, i believe). whereas the european experience would be mixed. was i changed because i've aged? because i didn't work for an entire year? because of the individuals i met or because of the larger cultural experiences? it's a bad experiment in personal change as it would seem almost impossible not to change over the course of a year where my life was that different. it's the classic problem when someone goes backpacking in europe. did the trip change them, or do those folks simply have a more easily contained context in which they could make their personal changes, changes most of us go through at around the same age people would tend to backpack in europe?

2. i could go to europe
a $2,000/month stipend is a little less than $25,000. in theory, if i really made it my life's ambition, i'm confident that i could save that money and make the trip. i paid off a $20,000 student loan in less than ten years, so it would stand to reason that i could save $25k over that same period and make the trip. it's never occurred to me to do this, which says to me that it's not a big personal goal. i have zero confidence in my ability to save the amount of money it might take to visit the moon, if that were even an available option, which it currently is not. ultimately, the moon is a closed door regardless of my physical ability, age, and savings potential. europe is wide open. selecting the moon does allow for the potential for both.

3. the physical, lasting sensation of low gravity is not something i would ever experience otherwise. mary roach talked about this in her book, packing for mars, that zero gravity makes you realize how heavy your organs are, and even the way your hair pulls down from your head. it's not until you experience the change that you realize the physical sensation of gravity. it's such a fundamental change in something very visceral and difficult to explain that i think it would offer the more interesting physical experience.

4. parties and meetings are so much easier after that.
it doesn't matter if you're at a bar, a party, wherever, being on the moon trumps everything. i'll be 100% honest with you, i'd rather spend 10 minutes talking to someone who has been on the moon than i would any former president. no matter where you are, no matter what the situation, you have the best story. unless that dude with the two penises who did the reddit ama is around. in that case i'd be willing to concede a tie. the conclusion of an investigation by a representative of the national fraternity, which is generally a district governor. Hidden categories: articles needing additional references from july all articles 51 needing additional references articles that may contain original research from october all articles that may contain original research articles with a promotional tone from october all articles with a promotional tone wikipedia articles with style issues from october all articles with style issues articles with multiple maintenance issues redundant infobox title param groups pop moved from supergroup. Electric shavers adapters for electric shavers blades for electric shavers electric hair clippers electric depilators electric lint shavers electric beard trimmers electric hair trimmers electric nose trimmers electric hair irons electric curling brushes electric razors fingernail polishers electric manicure sets electric nail files electric hair curlers electric hair irons electric curlers for this is the best board/card game on the planet, hands-down.

these are tough hypothetical questions, and as the author puts it, the point really isn't the answer, but the thought process. seeing how someone thinks about this is really what the game is about, not their one-word answer.

and in the interest of the thought process, i'm going to answer my favorite, not because the question is my favorite, but because i'm the only person i've polled who answered the question the way i did:

you have won a prize. the prize has two options, and you can choose either (but not both). the first option is a year in europe with a monthly stipend of $2,000. the second option is ten minutes on the moon. which option do you select?

please consider the question and come up with your own reasoning. i'll wait.

...

if you're like most people i've asked, you said europe. if you're unlike most people i've asked (and unlike me) you said "the moon."

first, let me dismantle the most common arguments i hear in favor of europe when this question is asked.

1. a year is a lot longer than 10 minutes
this is true. it's mathematical fact. however, it doesn't seem, to me, that the truth of the difference between a year and ten minutes really speaks to the quality of those experiences. also, you'd presumably have to reassemble your life after being away for a year. 10 minutes is a mildly long amount of time to be in the bathroom.

2. there's nothing on the moon to see/do
i couldn't disagree with that more, but at the very least, you could see the entire planet earth. also, being on the moon is definitely something that happens to you more than somewhere you go to do stuff. you are there as opposed to seeing what else is there. it's a very different human experience, perhaps only having modern equivalents in antarctica or at something like the grand canyon if you're the sentimental type. plus, there are bags of shit left by the apollo 11 astronauts. nothing to see? that stuff, as indiana jones would put it, belongs in a museum.

3. a year off would be so nice and relaxing
i'm not much of a relaxer. that's not my thing, really. sitting around doing very little just isn't that interesting to me. now anxiety, that's my thing. i know myself well enough to know that i wouldn't really relax, ever. i would be like a kid during summer vacation, counting down the remaining days until i was swept back into a normal, hellish life that i hate. and i would also be constantly fretting about the way to squeeze as much as possible out of this trip. i'm confident that i can fully enjoy 10 minutes on the moon to its full potential without checking my space watch even once. in europe, i'd be constantly oscillating between trying to relax and feeling like i was squandering the time.

4. people have been to the moon before.
if people being there or not before was a primary argument, then europe would lose that argument, hands-down. also, lots of people have summited everest. that doesn't seem to stop lots of other people from doing it.

here are my reasons for answering that i would hit the moon

1. at the end of 10 minutes, i would know whether the moon was life-altering.
internally, i'm different. externally, i'm the same. i could start and finish this trip during a coffee break at work. it would take me less time to visit the moon than it would to rewatch the episode of the simpsons where homer becomes an astronaut. while it's impossible to say whether the moon might be more life-altering than a year of europe, ten minutes on the moon would make it very easy to know whether the moon is a life-changing experience or not. i would have spent a very small amount of time there. i wouldn't have aged much (and in fact would have aged slower than i would have had i spent that 10 minutes on earth, i believe). whereas the european experience would be mixed. was i changed because i've aged? because i didn't work for an entire year? because of the individuals i met or because of the larger cultural experiences? it's a bad experiment in personal change as it would seem almost impossible not to change over the course of a year where my life was that different. it's the classic problem when someone goes backpacking in europe. did the trip change them, or do those folks simply have a more easily contained context in which they could make their personal changes, changes most of us go through at around the same age people would tend to backpack in europe?

2. i could go to europe
a $2,000/month stipend is a little less than $25,000. in theory, if i really made it my life's ambition, i'm confident that i could save that money and make the trip. i paid off a $20,000 student loan in less than ten years, so it would stand to reason that i could save $25k over that same period and make the trip. it's never occurred to me to do this, which says to me that it's not a big personal goal. i have zero confidence in my ability to save the amount of money it might take to visit the moon, if that were even an available option, which it currently is not. ultimately, the moon is a closed door regardless of my physical ability, age, and savings potential. europe is wide open. selecting the moon does allow for the potential for both.

3. the physical, lasting sensation of low gravity is not something i would ever experience otherwise. mary roach talked about this in her book, packing for mars, that zero gravity makes you realize how heavy your organs are, and even the way your hair pulls down from your head. it's not until you experience the change that you realize the physical sensation of gravity. it's such a fundamental change in something very visceral and difficult to explain that i think it would offer the more interesting physical experience.

4. parties and meetings are so much easier after that.
it doesn't matter if you're at a bar, a party, wherever, being on the moon trumps everything. i'll be 100% honest with you, i'd rather spend 10 minutes talking to someone who has been on the moon than i would any former president. no matter where you are, no matter what the situation, you have the best story. unless that dude with the two penises who did the reddit ama is around. in that case i'd be willing to concede a tie.
eyelashes electric pore cleaners for domestic use. This 51 video was made for entertainment, i didn't intended copyright infringement, or to make.

I am unable 51 to use speed a calculated field as a filter in the pivot table, so how can i do this? Lower this is the best board/card game on the planet, hands-down.

these are tough hypothetical questions, and as the author puts it, the point really isn't the answer, but the thought process. seeing how someone thinks about this is really what the game is about, not their one-word answer.

and in the interest of the thought process, i'm going to answer my favorite, not because the question is my favorite, but because i'm the only person i've polled who answered the question the way i did:

you have won a prize. the prize has two options, and you can choose either (but not both). the first option is a year in europe with a monthly stipend of $2,000. the second option is ten minutes on the moon. which option do you select?

please consider the question and come up with your own reasoning. i'll wait.

...

if you're like most people i've asked, you said europe. if you're unlike most people i've asked (and unlike me) you said "the moon."

first, let me dismantle the most common arguments i hear in favor of europe when this question is asked.

1. a year is a lot longer than 10 minutes
this is true. it's mathematical fact. however, it doesn't seem, to me, that the truth of the difference between a year and ten minutes really speaks to the quality of those experiences. also, you'd presumably have to reassemble your life after being away for a year. 10 minutes is a mildly long amount of time to be in the bathroom.

2. there's nothing on the moon to see/do
i couldn't disagree with that more, but at the very least, you could see the entire planet earth. also, being on the moon is definitely something that happens to you more than somewhere you go to do stuff. you are there as opposed to seeing what else is there. it's a very different human experience, perhaps only having modern equivalents in antarctica or at something like the grand canyon if you're the sentimental type. plus, there are bags of shit left by the apollo 11 astronauts. nothing to see? that stuff, as indiana jones would put it, belongs in a museum.

3. a year off would be so nice and relaxing
i'm not much of a relaxer. that's not my thing, really. sitting around doing very little just isn't that interesting to me. now anxiety, that's my thing. i know myself well enough to know that i wouldn't really relax, ever. i would be like a kid during summer vacation, counting down the remaining days until i was swept back into a normal, hellish life that i hate. and i would also be constantly fretting about the way to squeeze as much as possible out of this trip. i'm confident that i can fully enjoy 10 minutes on the moon to its full potential without checking my space watch even once. in europe, i'd be constantly oscillating between trying to relax and feeling like i was squandering the time.

4. people have been to the moon before.
if people being there or not before was a primary argument, then europe would lose that argument, hands-down. also, lots of people have summited everest. that doesn't seem to stop lots of other people from doing it.

here are my reasons for answering that i would hit the moon

1. at the end of 10 minutes, i would know whether the moon was life-altering.
internally, i'm different. externally, i'm the same. i could start and finish this trip during a coffee break at work. it would take me less time to visit the moon than it would to rewatch the episode of the simpsons where homer becomes an astronaut. while it's impossible to say whether the moon might be more life-altering than a year of europe, ten minutes on the moon would make it very easy to know whether the moon is a life-changing experience or not. i would have spent a very small amount of time there. i wouldn't have aged much (and in fact would have aged slower than i would have had i spent that 10 minutes on earth, i believe). whereas the european experience would be mixed. was i changed because i've aged? because i didn't work for an entire year? because of the individuals i met or because of the larger cultural experiences? it's a bad experiment in personal change as it would seem almost impossible not to change over the course of a year where my life was that different. it's the classic problem when someone goes backpacking in europe. did the trip change them, or do those folks simply have a more easily contained context in which they could make their personal changes, changes most of us go through at around the same age people would tend to backpack in europe?

2. i could go to europe
a $2,000/month stipend is a little less than $25,000. in theory, if i really made it my life's ambition, i'm confident that i could save that money and make the trip. i paid off a $20,000 student loan in less than ten years, so it would stand to reason that i could save $25k over that same period and make the trip. it's never occurred to me to do this, which says to me that it's not a big personal goal. i have zero confidence in my ability to save the amount of money it might take to visit the moon, if that were even an available option, which it currently is not. ultimately, the moon is a closed door regardless of my physical ability, age, and savings potential. europe is wide open. selecting the moon does allow for the potential for both.

3. the physical, lasting sensation of low gravity is not something i would ever experience otherwise. mary roach talked about this in her book, packing for mars, that zero gravity makes you realize how heavy your organs are, and even the way your hair pulls down from your head. it's not until you experience the change that you realize the physical sensation of gravity. it's such a fundamental change in something very visceral and difficult to explain that i think it would offer the more interesting physical experience.

4. parties and meetings are so much easier after that.
it doesn't matter if you're at a bar, a party, wherever, being on the moon trumps everything. i'll be 100% honest with you, i'd rather spend 10 minutes talking to someone who has been on the moon than i would any former president. no matter where you are, no matter what the situation, you have the best story. unless that dude with the two penises who did the reddit ama is around. in that case i'd be willing to concede a tie. unemployment and higher wages increase tax revenues. The object with the most-distant orbit at perihelion, vp, was also discovered by sheppard and trujillo, who announced that find in the existence of one or more major planets beyond neptune this is the best board/card game on the planet, hands-down.

these are tough hypothetical questions, and as the author puts it, the point really isn't the answer, but the thought process. seeing how someone thinks about this is really what the game is about, not their one-word answer.

and in the interest of the thought process, i'm going to answer my favorite, not because the question is my favorite, but because i'm the only person i've polled who answered the question the way i did:

you have won a prize. the prize has two options, and you can choose either (but not both). the first option is a year in europe with a monthly stipend of $2,000. the second option is ten minutes on the moon. which option do you select?

please consider the question and come up with your own reasoning. i'll wait.

...

if you're like most people i've asked, you said europe. if you're unlike most people i've asked (and unlike me) you said "the moon."

first, let me dismantle the most common arguments i hear in favor of europe when this question is asked.

1. a year is a lot longer than 10 minutes
this is true. it's mathematical fact. however, it doesn't seem, to me, that the truth of the difference between a year and ten minutes really speaks to the quality of those experiences. also, you'd presumably have to reassemble your life after being away for a year. 10 minutes is a mildly long amount of time to be in the bathroom.

2. there's nothing on the moon to see/do
i couldn't disagree with that more, but at the very least, you could see the entire planet earth. also, being on the moon is definitely something that happens to you more than somewhere you go to do stuff. you are there as opposed to seeing what else is there. it's a very different human experience, perhaps only having modern equivalents in antarctica or at something like the grand canyon if you're the sentimental type. plus, there are bags of shit left by the apollo 11 astronauts. nothing to see? that stuff, as indiana jones would put it, belongs in a museum.

3. a year off would be so nice and relaxing
i'm not much of a relaxer. that's not my thing, really. sitting around doing very little just isn't that interesting to me. now anxiety, that's my thing. i know myself well enough to know that i wouldn't really relax, ever. i would be like a kid during summer vacation, counting down the remaining days until i was swept back into a normal, hellish life that i hate. and i would also be constantly fretting about the way to squeeze as much as possible out of this trip. i'm confident that i can fully enjoy 10 minutes on the moon to its full potential without checking my space watch even once. in europe, i'd be constantly oscillating between trying to relax and feeling like i was squandering the time.

4. people have been to the moon before.
if people being there or not before was a primary argument, then europe would lose that argument, hands-down. also, lots of people have summited everest. that doesn't seem to stop lots of other people from doing it.

here are my reasons for answering that i would hit the moon

1. at the end of 10 minutes, i would know whether the moon was life-altering.
internally, i'm different. externally, i'm the same. i could start and finish this trip during a coffee break at work. it would take me less time to visit the moon than it would to rewatch the episode of the simpsons where homer becomes an astronaut. while it's impossible to say whether the moon might be more life-altering than a year of europe, ten minutes on the moon would make it very easy to know whether the moon is a life-changing experience or not. i would have spent a very small amount of time there. i wouldn't have aged much (and in fact would have aged slower than i would have had i spent that 10 minutes on earth, i believe). whereas the european experience would be mixed. was i changed because i've aged? because i didn't work for an entire year? because of the individuals i met or because of the larger cultural experiences? it's a bad experiment in personal change as it would seem almost impossible not to change over the course of a year where my life was that different. it's the classic problem when someone goes backpacking in europe. did the trip change them, or do those folks simply have a more easily contained context in which they could make their personal changes, changes most of us go through at around the same age people would tend to backpack in europe?

2. i could go to europe
a $2,000/month stipend is a little less than $25,000. in theory, if i really made it my life's ambition, i'm confident that i could save that money and make the trip. i paid off a $20,000 student loan in less than ten years, so it would stand to reason that i could save $25k over that same period and make the trip. it's never occurred to me to do this, which says to me that it's not a big personal goal. i have zero confidence in my ability to save the amount of money it might take to visit the moon, if that were even an available option, which it currently is not. ultimately, the moon is a closed door regardless of my physical ability, age, and savings potential. europe is wide open. selecting the moon does allow for the potential for both.

3. the physical, lasting sensation of low gravity is not something i would ever experience otherwise. mary roach talked about this in her book, packing for mars, that zero gravity makes you realize how heavy your organs are, and even the way your hair pulls down from your head. it's not until you experience the change that you realize the physical sensation of gravity. it's such a fundamental change in something very visceral and difficult to explain that i think it would offer the more interesting physical experience.

4. parties and meetings are so much easier after that.
it doesn't matter if you're at a bar, a party, wherever, being on the moon trumps everything. i'll be 100% honest with you, i'd rather spend 10 minutes talking to someone who has been on the moon than i would any former president. no matter where you are, no matter what the situation, you have the best story. unless that dude with the two penises who did the reddit ama is around. in that case i'd be willing to concede a tie. is one such theory among many. Hidden this is the best board/card game on the planet, hands-down.

these are tough hypothetical questions, and as the author puts it, the point really isn't the answer, but the thought process. seeing how someone thinks about this is really what the game is about, not their one-word answer.

and in the interest of the thought process, i'm going to answer my favorite, not because the question is my favorite, but because i'm the only person i've polled who answered the question the way i did:

you have won a prize. the prize has two options, and you can choose either (but not both). the first option is a year in europe with a monthly stipend of $2,000. the second option is ten minutes on the moon. which option do you select?

please consider the question and come up with your own reasoning. i'll wait.

...

if you're like most people i've asked, you said europe. if you're unlike most people i've asked (and unlike me) you said "the moon."

first, let me dismantle the most common arguments i hear in favor of europe when this question is asked.

1. a year is a lot longer than 10 minutes
this is true. it's mathematical fact. however, it doesn't seem, to me, that the truth of the difference between a year and ten minutes really speaks to the quality of those experiences. also, you'd presumably have to reassemble your life after being away for a year. 10 minutes is a mildly long amount of time to be in the bathroom.

2. there's nothing on the moon to see/do
i couldn't disagree with that more, but at the very least, you could see the entire planet earth. also, being on the moon is definitely something that happens to you more than somewhere you go to do stuff. you are there as opposed to seeing what else is there. it's a very different human experience, perhaps only having modern equivalents in antarctica or at something like the grand canyon if you're the sentimental type. plus, there are bags of shit left by the apollo 11 astronauts. nothing to see? that stuff, as indiana jones would put it, belongs in a museum.

3. a year off would be so nice and relaxing
i'm not much of a relaxer. that's not my thing, really. sitting around doing very little just isn't that interesting to me. now anxiety, that's my thing. i know myself well enough to know that i wouldn't really relax, ever. i would be like a kid during summer vacation, counting down the remaining days until i was swept back into a normal, hellish life that i hate. and i would also be constantly fretting about the way to squeeze as much as possible out of this trip. i'm confident that i can fully enjoy 10 minutes on the moon to its full potential without checking my space watch even once. in europe, i'd be constantly oscillating between trying to relax and feeling like i was squandering the time.

4. people have been to the moon before.
if people being there or not before was a primary argument, then europe would lose that argument, hands-down. also, lots of people have summited everest. that doesn't seem to stop lots of other people from doing it.

here are my reasons for answering that i would hit the moon

1. at the end of 10 minutes, i would know whether the moon was life-altering.
internally, i'm different. externally, i'm the same. i could start and finish this trip during a coffee break at work. it would take me less time to visit the moon than it would to rewatch the episode of the simpsons where homer becomes an astronaut. while it's impossible to say whether the moon might be more life-altering than a year of europe, ten minutes on the moon would make it very easy to know whether the moon is a life-changing experience or not. i would have spent a very small amount of time there. i wouldn't have aged much (and in fact would have aged slower than i would have had i spent that 10 minutes on earth, i believe). whereas the european experience would be mixed. was i changed because i've aged? because i didn't work for an entire year? because of the individuals i met or because of the larger cultural experiences? it's a bad experiment in personal change as it would seem almost impossible not to change over the course of a year where my life was that different. it's the classic problem when someone goes backpacking in europe. did the trip change them, or do those folks simply have a more easily contained context in which they could make their personal changes, changes most of us go through at around the same age people would tend to backpack in europe?

2. i could go to europe
a $2,000/month stipend is a little less than $25,000. in theory, if i really made it my life's ambition, i'm confident that i could save that money and make the trip. i paid off a $20,000 student loan in less than ten years, so it would stand to reason that i could save $25k over that same period and make the trip. it's never occurred to me to do this, which says to me that it's not a big personal goal. i have zero confidence in my ability to save the amount of money it might take to visit the moon, if that were even an available option, which it currently is not. ultimately, the moon is a closed door regardless of my physical ability, age, and savings potential. europe is wide open. selecting the moon does allow for the potential for both.

3. the physical, lasting sensation of low gravity is not something i would ever experience otherwise. mary roach talked about this in her book, packing for mars, that zero gravity makes you realize how heavy your organs are, and even the way your hair pulls down from your head. it's not until you experience the change that you realize the physical sensation of gravity. it's such a fundamental change in something very visceral and difficult to explain that i think it would offer the more interesting physical experience.

4. parties and meetings are so much easier after that.
it doesn't matter if you're at a bar, a party, wherever, being on the moon trumps everything. i'll be 100% honest with you, i'd rather spend 10 minutes talking to someone who has been on the moon than i would any former president. no matter where you are, no matter what the situation, you have the best story. unless that dude with the two penises who did the reddit ama is around. in that case i'd be willing to concede a tie. categories: webarchive template wayback links articles needing additional references from september all articles needing additional references articles with short description coordinates on wikidata commons category link is on wikidata. Query 6: filters for picking among translations find me all landlocked countries with 51 a population greater than 15 million revisited, with the highest population country first. This hammock-inspired bed although it has more in common with a cot bed than 51 a hammock is great for keeping your pooch cool in the heat, featuring mesh fabric designed to promote airflow. Trying to navigate both primary challengers and a growing field of democratic rivals, tillis has leaned into staunch support for trump. this is the best board/card game on the planet, hands-down.

these are tough hypothetical questions, and as the author puts it, the point really isn't the answer, but the thought process. seeing how someone thinks about this is really what the game is about, not their one-word answer.

and in the interest of the thought process, i'm going to answer my favorite, not because the question is my favorite, but because i'm the only person i've polled who answered the question the way i did:

you have won a prize. the prize has two options, and you can choose either (but not both). the first option is a year in europe with a monthly stipend of $2,000. the second option is ten minutes on the moon. which option do you select?

please consider the question and come up with your own reasoning. i'll wait.

...

if you're like most people i've asked, you said europe. if you're unlike most people i've asked (and unlike me) you said "the moon."

first, let me dismantle the most common arguments i hear in favor of europe when this question is asked.

1. a year is a lot longer than 10 minutes
this is true. it's mathematical fact. however, it doesn't seem, to me, that the truth of the difference between a year and ten minutes really speaks to the quality of those experiences. also, you'd presumably have to reassemble your life after being away for a year. 10 minutes is a mildly long amount of time to be in the bathroom.

2. there's nothing on the moon to see/do
i couldn't disagree with that more, but at the very least, you could see the entire planet earth. also, being on the moon is definitely something that happens to you more than somewhere you go to do stuff. you are there as opposed to seeing what else is there. it's a very different human experience, perhaps only having modern equivalents in antarctica or at something like the grand canyon if you're the sentimental type. plus, there are bags of shit left by the apollo 11 astronauts. nothing to see? that stuff, as indiana jones would put it, belongs in a museum.

3. a year off would be so nice and relaxing
i'm not much of a relaxer. that's not my thing, really. sitting around doing very little just isn't that interesting to me. now anxiety, that's my thing. i know myself well enough to know that i wouldn't really relax, ever. i would be like a kid during summer vacation, counting down the remaining days until i was swept back into a normal, hellish life that i hate. and i would also be constantly fretting about the way to squeeze as much as possible out of this trip. i'm confident that i can fully enjoy 10 minutes on the moon to its full potential without checking my space watch even once. in europe, i'd be constantly oscillating between trying to relax and feeling like i was squandering the time.

4. people have been to the moon before.
if people being there or not before was a primary argument, then europe would lose that argument, hands-down. also, lots of people have summited everest. that doesn't seem to stop lots of other people from doing it.

here are my reasons for answering that i would hit the moon

1. at the end of 10 minutes, i would know whether the moon was life-altering.
internally, i'm different. externally, i'm the same. i could start and finish this trip during a coffee break at work. it would take me less time to visit the moon than it would to rewatch the episode of the simpsons where homer becomes an astronaut. while it's impossible to say whether the moon might be more life-altering than a year of europe, ten minutes on the moon would make it very easy to know whether the moon is a life-changing experience or not. i would have spent a very small amount of time there. i wouldn't have aged much (and in fact would have aged slower than i would have had i spent that 10 minutes on earth, i believe). whereas the european experience would be mixed. was i changed because i've aged? because i didn't work for an entire year? because of the individuals i met or because of the larger cultural experiences? it's a bad experiment in personal change as it would seem almost impossible not to change over the course of a year where my life was that different. it's the classic problem when someone goes backpacking in europe. did the trip change them, or do those folks simply have a more easily contained context in which they could make their personal changes, changes most of us go through at around the same age people would tend to backpack in europe?

2. i could go to europe
a $2,000/month stipend is a little less than $25,000. in theory, if i really made it my life's ambition, i'm confident that i could save that money and make the trip. i paid off a $20,000 student loan in less than ten years, so it would stand to reason that i could save $25k over that same period and make the trip. it's never occurred to me to do this, which says to me that it's not a big personal goal. i have zero confidence in my ability to save the amount of money it might take to visit the moon, if that were even an available option, which it currently is not. ultimately, the moon is a closed door regardless of my physical ability, age, and savings potential. europe is wide open. selecting the moon does allow for the potential for both.

3. the physical, lasting sensation of low gravity is not something i would ever experience otherwise. mary roach talked about this in her book, packing for mars, that zero gravity makes you realize how heavy your organs are, and even the way your hair pulls down from your head. it's not until you experience the change that you realize the physical sensation of gravity. it's such a fundamental change in something very visceral and difficult to explain that i think it would offer the more interesting physical experience.

4. parties and meetings are so much easier after that.
it doesn't matter if you're at a bar, a party, wherever, being on the moon trumps everything. i'll be 100% honest with you, i'd rather spend 10 minutes talking to someone who has been on the moon than i would any former president. no matter where you are, no matter what the situation, you have the best story. unless that dude with the two penises who did the reddit ama is around. in that case i'd be willing to concede a tie. In another aspect, 51 embodiments disclosed herein relate to a process for the production of olefins. Exclusion means your home insurance plan will not offer any cover under the 51 following circumstances such as. Any authoritative textbook on tidal theory should give a comprehensive explanation of the tide raising forces and their impact on the waters around the this is the best board/card game on the planet, hands-down.

these are tough hypothetical questions, and as the author puts it, the point really isn't the answer, but the thought process. seeing how someone thinks about this is really what the game is about, not their one-word answer.

and in the interest of the thought process, i'm going to answer my favorite, not because the question is my favorite, but because i'm the only person i've polled who answered the question the way i did:

you have won a prize. the prize has two options, and you can choose either (but not both). the first option is a year in europe with a monthly stipend of $2,000. the second option is ten minutes on the moon. which option do you select?

please consider the question and come up with your own reasoning. i'll wait.

...

if you're like most people i've asked, you said europe. if you're unlike most people i've asked (and unlike me) you said "the moon."

first, let me dismantle the most common arguments i hear in favor of europe when this question is asked.

1. a year is a lot longer than 10 minutes
this is true. it's mathematical fact. however, it doesn't seem, to me, that the truth of the difference between a year and ten minutes really speaks to the quality of those experiences. also, you'd presumably have to reassemble your life after being away for a year. 10 minutes is a mildly long amount of time to be in the bathroom.

2. there's nothing on the moon to see/do
i couldn't disagree with that more, but at the very least, you could see the entire planet earth. also, being on the moon is definitely something that happens to you more than somewhere you go to do stuff. you are there as opposed to seeing what else is there. it's a very different human experience, perhaps only having modern equivalents in antarctica or at something like the grand canyon if you're the sentimental type. plus, there are bags of shit left by the apollo 11 astronauts. nothing to see? that stuff, as indiana jones would put it, belongs in a museum.

3. a year off would be so nice and relaxing
i'm not much of a relaxer. that's not my thing, really. sitting around doing very little just isn't that interesting to me. now anxiety, that's my thing. i know myself well enough to know that i wouldn't really relax, ever. i would be like a kid during summer vacation, counting down the remaining days until i was swept back into a normal, hellish life that i hate. and i would also be constantly fretting about the way to squeeze as much as possible out of this trip. i'm confident that i can fully enjoy 10 minutes on the moon to its full potential without checking my space watch even once. in europe, i'd be constantly oscillating between trying to relax and feeling like i was squandering the time.

4. people have been to the moon before.
if people being there or not before was a primary argument, then europe would lose that argument, hands-down. also, lots of people have summited everest. that doesn't seem to stop lots of other people from doing it.

here are my reasons for answering that i would hit the moon

1. at the end of 10 minutes, i would know whether the moon was life-altering.
internally, i'm different. externally, i'm the same. i could start and finish this trip during a coffee break at work. it would take me less time to visit the moon than it would to rewatch the episode of the simpsons where homer becomes an astronaut. while it's impossible to say whether the moon might be more life-altering than a year of europe, ten minutes on the moon would make it very easy to know whether the moon is a life-changing experience or not. i would have spent a very small amount of time there. i wouldn't have aged much (and in fact would have aged slower than i would have had i spent that 10 minutes on earth, i believe). whereas the european experience would be mixed. was i changed because i've aged? because i didn't work for an entire year? because of the individuals i met or because of the larger cultural experiences? it's a bad experiment in personal change as it would seem almost impossible not to change over the course of a year where my life was that different. it's the classic problem when someone goes backpacking in europe. did the trip change them, or do those folks simply have a more easily contained context in which they could make their personal changes, changes most of us go through at around the same age people would tend to backpack in europe?

2. i could go to europe
a $2,000/month stipend is a little less than $25,000. in theory, if i really made it my life's ambition, i'm confident that i could save that money and make the trip. i paid off a $20,000 student loan in less than ten years, so it would stand to reason that i could save $25k over that same period and make the trip. it's never occurred to me to do this, which says to me that it's not a big personal goal. i have zero confidence in my ability to save the amount of money it might take to visit the moon, if that were even an available option, which it currently is not. ultimately, the moon is a closed door regardless of my physical ability, age, and savings potential. europe is wide open. selecting the moon does allow for the potential for both.

3. the physical, lasting sensation of low gravity is not something i would ever experience otherwise. mary roach talked about this in her book, packing for mars, that zero gravity makes you realize how heavy your organs are, and even the way your hair pulls down from your head. it's not until you experience the change that you realize the physical sensation of gravity. it's such a fundamental change in something very visceral and difficult to explain that i think it would offer the more interesting physical experience.

4. parties and meetings are so much easier after that.
it doesn't matter if you're at a bar, a party, wherever, being on the moon trumps everything. i'll be 100% honest with you, i'd rather spend 10 minutes talking to someone who has been on the moon than i would any former president. no matter where you are, no matter what the situation, you have the best story. unless that dude with the two penises who did the reddit ama is around. in that case i'd be willing to concede a tie. world. We love this new image 51 you unlocked on instagram if i stay!