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Socrates and his God (May 2004)

Given what we hear from him in The Apology, it is not clear why Socrates “follows” his God, Apollo. There is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

At least in The Apology, Socrates never says he “follows” God. Instead, he characterizes himself as God’s gift to the Athenians. He says, “I am really one given to you by God” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows Him as he is an extension or a key possession of His. He argues that it is because he is a gift of God’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. It is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows God because He is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

But there is also evidence in “the Apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow God but as drawn to follow Him. When Socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “God commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow Athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by God with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. The prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. It is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. That is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, Apollo. He trusts Apollo because he believes Him “wise” (429) and good. Alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. But following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow Athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to God” (436).

But his defence also provides evidence for understanding Socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. Socrates argues that following His commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). Unlike Oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, Socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to Him and to most important Athenians. Socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

Socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. Socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as Odysseus in his afterlife. He says that only God knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

We have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why Socrates “follows” his god. Socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. We might at least agree that Socrates follows God because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in The Apology to consider otherwise. Socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. In this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of God, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to Him.

Work Cited
Aristotle. The Philosophy of Aristotle. Comp. Renford Bambrough. Eds. J.L.Creed and A.E. Wardman. New York: Signet, 2003.

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given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
art of cultivating plants and livestock. But social media isn't just a tool for mobilizing people. Although there are differences socrates and his god (may 2004)

given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
between the stool microbiota and other sites in the distal large intestine in the same subject, these differences are smaller than the differences between subjects, and so, provide a good readout of the distal large intestine although note that the small intestine differs substantially in its microbiology eckburg et al. Socrates and his god (may 2004)

given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
find this pin and more on recipes to try by mary hess. We made constant use of the beautiful fire within the home, which connects to the whole house ensuring you're wonderfully snug at all times. The cable went socrates and his god (may 2004)

given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
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given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
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given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
a gymnasium is a particular type of school in germany and other countries in europe, with the goal to prepare its pupils to enter a university. Do socrates and his god (may 2004)

given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
your own due diligence with the help of licensed, professional lawyers, accountants and investment counsellors. In, lacuna had his first national competition at the age of 8 socrates and his god (may 2004)

given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
that, winning a gold medal in the meter freestyle event. The fifth installment of the players have come to expect 10 years, but the game designers have tried socrates and his god (may 2004)

given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
to compensate for the long term a fair amount of innovation that can be found in simcity. To investigate the presence and role of fibroblast senescence in socrates and his god (may 2004)

given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
the dynamic process of corneal wound healing involving stromal cell apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. Moritz the fast and the 432 furious, sweet home alabama, with a whole new line-up of dazzling high-performance vehicles ready to burn up the screen. The reason for this pattern lies in socrates and his god (may 2004)

given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
the basic strategy for each deck type. Mswati ii was the greatest socrates and his god (may 2004)

given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
of the fighting kings of eswatini, and he greatly extended the area of the country to twice its current size. Socrates and his god (may 2004)

given what we hear from him in the apology, it is not clear why socrates “follows” his god, apollo. there is evidence to support three explanations: 1) because he is compelled to; 2) because he wants to enable goodness; and 3) out of self-interest.

at least in the apology, socrates never says he “follows” god. instead, he characterizes himself as god’s gift to the athenians. he says, “i am really one given to you by god” (437), and as such he is not so much someone who follows him as he is an extension or a key possession of his. he argues that it is because he is a gift of god’s that he possesses a capacity to neglect “all [his] [. . .] own interests” (437), and why an affront to him amounts to an offence against his god. it is a self-conception that makes him seem most like a puppet, most like someone who follows god because he is, so to speak, pulling his strings, and explains why he argues that he “cannot” “disobey the god” (443; emphasis added).

but there is also evidence in “the apology” to support understanding him as not compelled to follow god but as drawn to follow him. when socrates says that through “oracles and dreams” (439) his “god commands” him “to wake [. . .] up” (436) his fellow athenians, when he says that he was “posted” by god with a specific “duty to be a philosopher” (434-35), we sense he feels strongly obligated but not compelled to follow his god’s plans for him. the prophetic voice he hears “checks” him, it “opposes” (445) him. it is or has an “influence” (439) he strongly registers and which impedes his actions, but is not unequivocally presented as something which cannot be resisted. that is, we are left room to believe the primary reason he heeds its directions is because he “trust[s]” (441) its source, apollo. he trusts apollo because he believes him “wise” (429) and good. alone, though like everyone he would want to be good, he would never be sure what goodness was. but following the directions of his god makes him sure “there is no greater good for [his fellow athenians] [. . .] in the city in any way than [his] [. . .] service to god” (436).

but his defence also provides evidence for understanding socrates as following his god because servility has its (considerable) benefits. socrates argues that following his commands has meant an arduous life, but also a life of hearing from a “familiar prophetic voice [. . .] even in very small things” (445). unlike oedipus, who felt abandoned by the gods, socrates keeps constant company with his god—a god, who, yes, commands him to live a life which leaves him materially poor, but one who also leaves him feeling certain he is important both to him and to most important athenians. socrates suggests he has little or rather no interest in “title[s]” (429) or honor, but if we doubt his sincerity, he would have had to have done more than just point to his material poverty to prove he does not follow his god for riches.

socrates may not be proud or self-interested, but we know that even if he was he would be very unlikely to admit this to himself, for he has much riding on his being thought good by his god. socrates playfully imagines spending his time joyfully conversing with heroes such as odysseus in his afterlife. he says that only god knows what awaits him after death; but the reason he might be thinking of an ideal ultimate fate for himself is because he feels sure “no evil can happen to a good man either living or dead, and his business is not neglected by the gods” (446).

we have evidence, then, to support several hypotheses as to why socrates “follows” his god. socrates would disavow the latter, and possibly the latter two, but all three explanations are backed by evidence. we might at least agree that socrates follows god because he believes gods exist whom one might follow—but his accusers are given reason in the apology to consider otherwise. socrates constantly refers to his god in his defence, but one of the reasons he is on trial is because he is accused of being a dangerous atheist. in this position, a self-preserving atheist as much as a reverent follower of god, would be sure to intersperse his defence with references to him.

work cited
aristotle. the philosophy of aristotle. comp. renford bambrough. eds. j.l.creed and a.e. wardman. new york: signet, 2003.
punxsutawney news july 2, — so far, no announcement has been made for a public fourth of july celebration at punxsutawney, and the enjoyment of the holiday will be go-as-you please with our people.